FAQs



Reentry at Lehman aims to create a welcoming, supportive, and respectful learning environment for all Lehman students impacted by the criminal justice system, including those who have experienced incarceration and those who have family members who are currently or were formerly incarcerated.




CJI is an acronym for criminal-justice-impacted. This includes students who have experienced incarceration, probation or parole, as well as students who have family members who are currently or were formerly incarcerated, or on probation or parole.




Students do not have to disclose their criminal conviction when they apply. There are no questions on the applications that ask for this information.




It is totally up to the applicants as to whether they want to disclose this information. Lehman does not require essays at the undergraduate level, except for the Macaulay Honors College.




A criminal conviction could only come up during an admissions interview if a student decides to share this information.



Developing strong time management skills, creating a reliable support system and proper self-care are critical when navigating college life. These can be a challenge for students without a criminal record.




To maximize their Lehman College experience students shouldn't just go to class. It's important to also get involved in campus life. One way students can do this is by joining a club or two to see the world through a different lens. Students should join clubs and groups on campus that are related to their major and special interest. Getting connected helps cultivate a sense of belonging, which plays a large role in student success by creating accountability and community.




Lehman provides tutoring and mentoring for all students to help them with their education. Support for students' academic enrollment and registration is offered. In addition, there may be grants, stipends and free bus passes available for those who qualify. Finally, Lehman provides referrals to campus and community-based resources and partners that address specific needs such as housing, employment, legal services, personal finances, and scholarship information. Student Life, the Dean of Students and the Financial Aid Office are good places to ask about special programs.




CJI students are eligible for financial aid. However, if their incarceration was for a drug-related offense or if they are subject to an involuntary civil commitment for a sexual offense, their eligibility may be limited.




CJI students on probation or parole or living in a halfway house, may be eligible for federal student aid. But remember, if they were convicted of a drug-related offense or if they are subject to an involuntary civil commitment for a sexual offense, their eligibility may be limited.




Students' federal student aid eligibility might be suspended if their offense occurred while they were receiving federal student aid (grants, loans, or work-study). When students complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form, they will be asked whether they had a drug conviction for an offense that occurred while they were receiving federal student aid. If the answer is yes, they will be provided a worksheet to help them determine whether their conviction affects their eligibility for federal student aid. If their eligibility for federal student aid has been suspended due to a drug conviction, they can regain eligibility early by successfully completing an approved drug rehabilitation program or by passing two unannounced drug tests administered by an approved drug rehabilitation program. If they regain eligibility during the award year, they must notify their financial aid office immediately so they can get any aid they're eligible for. If they are convicted of a drug-related offense after they submit the FAFSA form, they might lose eligibility for federal student aid, and they might be liable for returning any financial aid they received during a period of ineligibility.




The only restrictions placed on CJI students regarding whom they can or cannot associate with are those placed on them by their parole or probation officer or by a court-ordered restraining order.




If students have been convicted of a forcible or non-forcible sexual offense, and they are subject to an involuntary civil commitment upon completion of a period of incarceration for that offense, they cannot receive a Federal Pell Grant.