Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences

John Locke

SELECTED PAPERS*
1. Locke, J. L. Subvocal speech in the service of short-term memory. Invited lecture presented at the Department of Psychology, Yale University, 1972.
2. Locke, J. L. Language and memory. Invited talk presented at the Department of Experimental Psychology, Oxford University, 1974.
3. Locke, J. L. Mechanisms of phonological development in children: maintenance, learning and loss. Department of Linguistics, University of Chicago, 1980.
4. Locke, J. L. Phonological structure: evidence from the child. Invited paper presented at the Department of Linguistics, University of Michigan, 1980.
5. Locke, J. L. Historical and developmental phonology. Invited lecture presented at the First Forum Lecture, Linguistic Institute, College Park, Maryland, 1982.
6. Locke, J. L. Speculations on the phonological nature of children's lexical representations. Invited talk to the Department of Psychology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1983.
7. Locke, J. L. Some phonetic correlates of lexical frequency. Invited talk at the Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1983.
8. Locke, J. L. Biological basis of language. Invited lecture presented at the Continuing Medical Education Program, Harvard Medical School, 1985.
9. Locke, J. L. Biolinguistics: the evolution of language in children. Invited paper presented at the School of Human Communication Disorders, McGill University, 1986.
10. Locke, J. L. Instinct for phonology. Invited paper presented at the International Symposium on Language Acquisition and Language Impairment in Children, Salsamaggiore Terme, Italy, 1987.
11. Locke, J. L. Developmental language disorders. Invited paper presented at the Continuing Medical Education Program, Harvard Medical School, 1987.
12. Locke, J. L. The emergence of spoken language in the human infant. Invited paper presented at the Distinguished Speakers Seminar, Human Information Processing Group, Princeton University, 1988.
13. Locke, J. L. Innate capability for linguistic phonology. Invited paper presented at the Fourth Annual Winter Conference on Current Issues in Developmental Psychobiology, Palmas del Mar, Puerto Rico, 1989.
* Includes only selected lectures prior to 1990.
14. Locke, J. L., and Pearson, D. M. Vocal learning and the emergence of phonological capacity: a neuropsychological approach. Invited paper presented at the International Conference on Phonological Development, Stanford University, 1989.
15. Locke, J. L. Development of the capacity for spoken language. Invited paper presented at the Language Acquisition Workshop, University of Chicago, 1990.
16. Locke, J. L. Vocal learning in human primates: a typology and evaluation of recent evidence. Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the American Society of Primatologists, Davis, California, 1990.
17. Locke, J. L. The role of perception in phonological development. Invited paper presented at the Sixth Italian Congress on Logopedics, Urbino, Italy, 1990.
18. Locke, J. L. Babbling and early speech, and their relevance to later speech and language development. Invited paper presented at the Sixth Italian Congress on Logopedics, Urbino, Italy, 1990.
19. Locke, J. L. Language, brain and social cognition. Invited paper presented at the Interdisciplinary Colloquium on Language and Cognition, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, 1991.
20. Locke, J. L. A biological characterization of babbling in the human infant. Invited paper presented at the Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, Connecticut, 1991.
21. Locke, J. L., Bekken, K. E., Wein, D., & McMinn-Larson, L. Emergent control of manual and vocal-motor activity in reference to human language. Society for Neuroscience, New Orleans, 1991.
22. Locke, J. L. The species typical path to spoken language. Invited paper presented at the Seventh Annual Winter Conference on Current Issues in Developmental Psychobiology, Cancun, Mexico, 1992.
23. Locke, J. L. The role of the face in vocal learning and the development of spoken language. Invited paper presented to the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Changes in Speech and Face Processing in Infancy: A Glimpse at Developmental Mechanisms of Cognition. Marseilles, France, 1992.
24. Locke, J. L. The creation of linguistic capacity: evolution in the species, development in the child. Invited Kendon Smith Lecture delivered to the Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 1992.
25. Locke, J. L. An ethological model of language processing. Invited paper presented to the Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1992.
26. Locke, J. L., Smith, S., Macaruso, P., Leftheri, K., & Powers, S. Short-term memory and phonological factors in dyslexia. National Academy of Neuropsychology, Pittsburgh, 1992.
27. Locke, J. L. Is there a critical period for development of language? Invited talk presented to the Biological Anthropology Department, Harvard University, 1993.
28. Locke, J. L. Critical and sensitive periods in the development of language. Invited talk presented to the Department of Linguistics, Harvard University, 1993.
29. Locke, J. L. Language development. Invited talk presented to the Sub-Department of Animal Behaviour, Cambridge University, January 1994.
30. Locke, J. L. The social path to spoken language. Invited talk presented to the Department of Social and Political Sciences, Cambridge University, February 1994.
31. Locke, J. L. The storage phase of language development. Invited talk presented to the Department of Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, February 1994.
32. Locke, J. L. The emergence of linguistic capacity in the infant and the species. Invited talk presented to the Department of Cognitive and Computing Sciences, University of Sussex, Brighton, February 1994.
33. Locke, J. L. Critical period for language? Development of species-typical neurolinguistic mechanisms. Invited talk presented to the Linguistics and Psychology Seminar Series, University of Reading, February 1994.
34. Locke, J. L. A theory of neurolinguistic development. Invited talk presented to the Department of Linguistics, Edinburgh University, Edinburgh, March 1994.
35. Locke, J. L. Why do infants begin to speak? The adaptive value of vocal learning. Talk presented to the Child Language Seminar, Bangor, Wales, March 1994.
36. Locke, J. L. The co-development of brain and language. Invited paper presented to the Irish Association for Applied Linguistics, Dublin, April 1994.
37. Locke, J. L. Learning to speak: from prosody to phonology. Invited talk presented to the Linguistics Institute of Ireland, Dublin, Ireland, April 1994.
38. Locke, J. L. Lexical storage pressures: a neurobiological view. Invited talk presented to the Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, May, 1994.
39. Locke, J. L. Why does the infant begin to speak? Language as an unintended consequence. Invited talk presented to the Department of Psychology, University of Warwick, Coventry, May, 1994.
40. Locke, J. L. Developmental language disorders: genes, brain mechanisms, and clinicians. Invited talk presented to the National Hospital’s College of Speech Sciences, London, May, 1994.
41. Locke, J. L. How does the brain develop linguistic capacity? Invited talk to the Departments of Psychology and Linguistics, University of Manchester, Manchester, May, 1994.
42. Locke, J. L. The gradual emergence of developmental language disorders. Invited talk presented to the Department of Psychology, Edinburgh University, Edinburgh, May, 1994.
43. Locke, J. L. The adaptive value of vocal learning. Invited talk presented to the Department of Psychology, Edinburgh University, Edinburgh, May, 1994.
44. Locke, J. L. How does the brain develop linguistic capacity? Invited talk presented to the Applied Psychology Unit, Medical Research Council, Cambridge, May, 1994.
45. Locke, J. L. Why does the infant begin to speak? Language as an unintended consequence. Invited paper presented at the Medical Research Council, London, May, 1994.
46. Locke, J. L. Talking. Symposium on prelinguistic vocal development: sensorimotor, prosodic, and social perspectives. Invited paper presented at the International Society for Infant Studies, Paris, June, 1994.
47. Locke, J. L. The adaptive child and the adaptive clinician. Invited paper presented at Children’s Hospital, Denver, May 1995.
48. Locke, J. L. Degrees of linguistic freedom: invited discussion of Barbara Landau’s paper at the International Symposium on Blindness and Psychological Development, University of Warwick, August 1995.
49. Locke, J. L. Phases in the development of linguistic capacity. Shortcourse delivered to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Orlando, Florida, December 1995.
50. Locke, J. L. Calling all etiologies. Invited paper delivered in the special session on “Emerging theories of etiology in specific language disorders,” American Speech-Language- Hearing Association, Orlando, Florida, December 1995.
51. Locke, J. L. Development of linguistic capacity in the human infant. Invited paper presented at the Department of Psychology, University of York, January 1996.
52. Locke, J. L. Dyslexia and early language acquisition. Invited keynote address to the conference on Learning Disabilities as a Barrier to Human Development, University of Stockholm, February 1996.
53. Locke, J. L. Talking as a precursor to spoken language. Conference on the Evolution of Language, University of Edinburgh, April 1996.
54. Locke, J. L. Antecedents to language in the infant and the species. Invited paper presented at the Conference on Infant Development, Barcelona, April 1996.
55. Locke, J. L. What causes language development? Invited paper presented at the Symposium on Research in Child Language Disorders, Madison, Wisconsin, June 1996,
56. Locke, J. L. Why do infants begin to talk? Special Session on Intentionality and Social Understanding of Infant Communication, VIIth International Congress for the Study of Child Language, Istanbul, July 1996.
57. Locke, J. L. What causes language development? Speculations from an evolutionary model. Invited paper presented at the Conference on the Emergence of Human Cognition and Language, Waseda University, Tokyo, September 1996.
58. Locke, J. L. The devoicing of America: the evolution and cultural demise of social talking. Invited paper presented at the University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa, October 1996.
59. Locke, J. L. Social sound-making, talking, and speaking: an evolutionary perspective. Invited paper presented at the University of Newcastle, October 1996.
60. Locke, J. L. We may never know. Invited paper presented in the seminar: “Does the distinction between articulation and phonology have clinical significance?” ASHA conference, Seattle, November 1996.
61. Hodgson, J., Macaruso, P., Locke, J., Roberts, J., Haynes, C., Bekken, K., Guttentag, C., Smith, S., & Sokol, S. Precursors to dyslexia: language development in children of dyslexic parents. Orton Dyslexia Society. Boston, November 1996.
62. Locke, J. L. Early developmental delay: problems for the theorist. Invited paper presented at the Joint Wenner-Gren and Rodin Academy conference on “Basic neural mechanisms in cognition and language - with special reference to phonological problems.” Stockholm, February 1997.
63. Locke, J. L. Talking: biological ascent, cultural decline. Invited paper presented at the Zangwill Club, Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, February 1997.
64. Locke, J. L. Malinowski’s revenge: the rise and fall of social talking. Invited paper presented at the City University, London, March 1997.
65. Locke, J. L. The child’s first steps towards spoken language (and other topics). Invited paper presented at the Spring Meeting of the Maine Speech-Language Hearing Association, Ogunquit, Maine, March 1997.
66. Locke, J. L. The development of developmental dyslexia. Invited paper presented at the British Dyslexia Conference, York, April 1997.
67. Macaruso, P. A., Hodgson, J. M., Locke, J. L., Roberts, J., & Smith, S. Language and cognitive development in children of dyslexic parents. Poster presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Washington, D. C., April 1997.
68. Connor, C. M., Zwolan, T. A., & Locke, J. L. Developmental neurolinguistics and language development in children using cochlear implants. Fifth International Cochlear Implant Conference, New York 1997.
69. Locke, J. L. Language development. Invited paper presented at the Conference of the Parent Network for the Post-Institutionalized Child, Coventry, May 1997.
70. Locke, J. L. Why is linguistic capacity so large? Invited paper presented at the Fourth Evolution of Mind Workshop, Hang Seng Centre for Cognitive Studies, University of Sheffield, September 1997.
71. Locke, J. L. Turing the world: some hidden costs. Invited paper presented at the Institute for Language, Speech, and Hearing, University of Sheffield, October 1997.
72. Locke, J. L. Invited paper presented in the special session on “The evolution of speech language” at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Boston, November 1997.
73. Locke, J. L. The path to spoken language: development of a personal and social voice. Invited paper presented in the symposium on “The epigenetic approach to language development,” American Association for the Advancement of Science, Philadelphia, March 1998.
74. Locke, J. L. Rank, reciprocity, and relationships in the evolution of language. Second Evolution of Language Conference, University of East London, April 1998.
75. Locke, J. L. The development of spoken language disorders. Invited paper presented at the Niilo Maeki Institute on Early Cognition and Learning Disorders, Jyvaskyla, Finland, August 1998.
76. Locke, J. L. Re-voicing the world: costs and benefits. Invited keynote address presented at the Research Symposium of the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Dublin, August 1998.
77. Locke, J. L. Are developmental language disorders primarily grammatical? Invited keynote address presented at the Child Language Seminar, Sheffield, September 1998.
78. Locke, J. L. The stilling of vocal America. Invited address to the faculty and students of Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, November 1998.
79. Locke, J. L. The de-voicing of society: new clinical challenges. Shortcourse presented to the American Speech-Hearing-Language Association, San Antonio, November 1998.
80. Locke, J. L. Sex and status effects in the volubility of primates: clues to the origin of vocal languages? Invited talk to the Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, February 1999.
81. Locke, J. L. First communion: the emergence of vocal relationships. Invited talk presented at the Conference on Emotion and Communication, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, March 1999.
82. Locke, J. L. Virtually voiceless: collaboration in the digital age. Invited talk presented to the Health & Safety Executive, London, May 1999.
83. Locke, J. L. Kuala Lumpur syndrome: personal, social, and political effects of communication technologies. Keynote address presented to the Symposium on Social Cohesion, Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, Amsterdam, June 2000.
84. Locke, J. L. Vocal behaviour in the human infant: functions and phonetics. Keynote address presented to the Conference of the International Clinical Phonetics and Linguistics Association, Edinburgh, August 2000.
85. Chen, Z.-Y., Cowell, P. E., Hugdahl, K., & Locke, J. L. Neurocognitive profiles in adults with family history of developmental language disorders. British Psychological Society, University of Essex, September 2000.
86. Locke, J. L. I woke up thinking about SLI: it must have been a dream. Colloquium address, New York University, March 2001.
87. Locke, J. L. The quest for intimate knowledge and experience: biology, culture, and human communication. Invited university address, New York University, April 2001.
88. Locke, J. L. The function of vocal behavior in the human infant. Invited talk, Program in Speech & Hearing Sciences, CUNY Graduate School Center, New York, May 2001.
89. Locke, J. L. Parental selection of vocal behaviors in the evolution of spoken language. Invited presented to the Symposium on The Evolution of the Human Vocal Capacity. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, New Orleans, November 2001.
90. Locke, J. L. The biology of eavesdropping: personal intimacy and social control. Invited talk presented at the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research. Vienna, Austria, December 2001.
91. Locke, J. L. The role of parental selection in the evolution of vocal capacity. Fourth International Conference on the Evolution of Language, Harvard University, March 2002.
92. Locke, J. L. Parental factors in the evolution of vocal capacity. Developmental Psychobiology, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital, April 2002.
93. Locke, J. L. The biology of eavesdropping: intimate experience and social control. Invited address, Ohio University Regional Conference on Hearing, Speech and Language Sciences, Athens, Ohio, May 2002.
94. Locke, J. L. Communication by theft: the acquisition and use of intimate capital. Third Media Ecology Convention, New York, June 2002.
95. Locke, J. L. Parental selection in the evolution of vocal capacity. International Society of Human Ethology, Montreal, August 2002.
96. Locke, J. L. Surveillance and control: biology, history, and contemporary issues. American Association for Politics and the Life Sciences, Montreal, August 2002.
97. Locke, J. L. Communication by theft: eavesdropping and gossip in the digital age. Invited address, 83rd Meeting of the Media Ecology Association, Rosendale, New York, November 2002.
98. Smith, S., Roberts, J., & Locke, J. L. Emergent sound systems of children later identified as dyslexic. Poster presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Atlanta, November 2003.
99. Locke, J. L. The development of language disorders. Invited address, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, December 2002.
100. Locke, J. L. The evolution of human intimacy: a “skeletal” proposal. Invited address, University of Vienna, Austria, April 2003.
101. Locke, J. L. Words for all seasons: some remarks on life and language. Invited address delivered to the Phi Beta Kappa Society, Lehman College, New York, May 2003.
102. Locke, J. L. Lipsmacking and babbling: syllables, sociality, and survival. Invited paper delivered to the International Congress of Phonetic Science, Barcelona, Spain, 2003.
103. Locke, J. L. The co-evolution of language and childhood. University of Michigan- Dearborn, 2003.
104. Locke, J. L. Language and life: a new perspective on evolution and development. University of Maine, Orono, 2003.
105. Smith, S. L., Roberts, J., & Locke, J. L. A longitudinal study of phonological production in children with dyslexia. Poster presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Chicago, 2003.
106. Roberts, J., Lambrecht-Smith, S., & Locke, J. L. Early lexical growth profiles of dyslexic children. Paper presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Chicago, 2003.
107. Locke, J. L. A life history approach to the development of language. Keynote address, NET (Netwerk Eerste Taalverwerving) Language Acquisition Symposium, Antwerp, 2004.
108. Locke, J. L. A life history approach to the evolution of language. Paper delivered to the Fifth International Conference on the Evolution of Language, Leipzig, 2004.
109. Locke, J. L. Infant vocal development and foundations for the linguistic capacity: selected comments. International Society on Infant Studies, Chicago, 2004.
110. Smith, S. L., Roberts, J., Locke, J. L., Hodgson, J., & Macaruso, P. Precursors to dyslexia: phonological and lexical markers. Paper delivered in the symposium “Precursors of reading disability: present status and future directions,” at the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading, Amsterdam, July, 2004.
111. Locke, J. L. The origin and descent of speech: a vocal approach to human language in the infant and the species. Invited paper delivered in the Symposium “Spraak in de Maak,” in Honor of Florien van Beinum, Amsterdam, 2004.
112. Locke, J. L. An ontogenetic approach to the evolution of human language. Paper delivered to the International Society for Human Ethology, Ghent, 2004.
113. Locke, J. L. Language and life history. Seminar presented to the American Speech- Language-Hearing Association, Philadelphia, November, 2004.
114. Roberts, J., Lambrecht-Smith, S., Rossi, A., & Locke, J. L. Further validation of a late talking subgroup of dyslexic children. Poster presented at the American Speech-Language- Hearing Association, Philadelphia, November, 2004.
115. Lambrecht-Smith, S., Roberts, J., Locke, J. L., Giles, J., & Bourque, M. Phonological restructuring in the early lexicon of children with dyslexia. Poster presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Philadelphia, November, 2004.
116. Roberts, J., Lambrecht-Smith, S., Scott, K., Macaruso, P., Hodgson, J., & Locke, J. L. Toddlers and preschoolers: toddler and preschool language outcomes of dyslexic children. Poster presented to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, San Diego, November, 2005.
117. Lambrecht-Smith, S., Roberts, J., & Locke, J. L. Phonological and articulatory processes in children: phonological complexity in the developing lexicons of children with dyslexia. Poster presented to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, San Diego, November, 2005.
118. Locke, J. L. Contributions of ontogenetic stages to the evolution of language. Paper delivered to ELA 2005, Lyon, France, December, 2005.
119. Locke, J. L., & Bogin, B. Language and life history: a new perspective on the development and evolution of language. Paper presented at the UCSD Project for Explaining the Origin of Humans, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California, March 3-4, 2006.
120. Locke, J. L. Interaction of developmental and evolutionary processes in the emergence of spoken language. Paper presented at the Sixth International Conference on the Evolution of Language, Rome, April, 2006.
121. Locke, J. L. Interactions between developmental and evolutionary processes in the emergence of spoken language. Talk presented to the Developmental Language Laboratory, Graduate Center, City University of New York, April, 2006.
122. Locke, J. L. The emergence of human language: contributions of evolution and development. Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, September, 2006.
123. Locke, J. L. Emergence of human language: the role of development. School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, October 6, 2006.
124. Bogin, B., & Locke, J. L. Language and life history: a new perspective on the development and evolution of language. Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama (Tokyo), Japan, October, 2006.
125. Locke, J. L. Evolutionary developmental linguistics: naturalization of the faculty of language. Keynote address presented to the International Linguistic Association, New York, March 30, 2007.
126. Locke, J. L. The end of development. Talk given to the Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Connecticut, Storrs, April 20, 2007.
127. Locke, J. L. Evolutionary developmental linguistics: naturalization of the faculty of language. Talk given to the Cognitive Science Colloquium, University of Connecticut, Storrs, April 20, 2007.
128. Locke, J. L. Development of the capacity for spoken language: new insights from evolution. Keynote address to be presented to the Nordic Conference on Language Development and Language Impairment in Children and Young Adults, Norwegian Support System for Special Education, Oslo, Norway, September 27-29, 2007.
129. Smith, S. L., & Locke, J. L. Babbling to reading? Early phonological production in children with dyslexia. Paper to be delivered to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Boston, 2007.
130. Smith, A., & Locke, J. L. Factors underlying speech timing patterns in young children. Poster to be delivered to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Boston, 2007.
131. Locke, J. L. Prying eyes and wagging tongues: why we eavesdrop and gossip. Talk to be given to the Harvard Club of New York, September 10, 2008.
132. Lambrecht Smith, S., Roberts, J., & Locke, J. Complexity of early syllable productions in children with reading disabilities. Paper to be presented to the Society for Research on Child Development, 2008.
133. Progovac, L., & Locke, J. L. Exocentric compounds, ritual insult, and the evolution of syntax. Biolinguistics: Acquisition and Language Evolution, York, England, July, 2008.
134. Locke, J. L. Human needs: an ethological approach. International Society for Schema Therapy, Coimbra, Portugal, October, 2008.
135. Locke, J. L. Vocal and verbal complexity: a fitness account of language, situated in development. International Society for Human Ethology, Orono, Maine, July 2009.
136. Locke, J. L., & Flanagan, C. M. Human needs. International Society for Human Ethology, Orono, Maine, July, 2009.
137. Locke, J. L. A functional account of language development: insights from evolution. Invited address. Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Science, New York Univeristy, November, 2009
138. Locke, J. L. A functional account of language development, situated in human evolution Short course delivered to the ASHA convention, New Orleans, November, 2009.
139. Locke, J. L. The canal boat children of early 20th century England: insights into the nature of language and the ability to speak. Invited address, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, Massachusetts, January 27, 2010.
140. Locke, J. L. Duels and duets:; sex, dominance, and the evolution of language. State University of New York, Binghamton, October 14, 2010.

Return to Faculty page

 

Last modified: Oct 25, 2011

Text Only Version of Site | Make This Website Talk